Top 10 books to read in a lifetime

10. Arthur Golden- Memoirs of a geisha

Memoirs of a Geisha is a historical novel by American author Arthur Golden, published in 1997. The novel, told in first person perspective, tells the fictional story of a geisha working in Kyoto, Japan, before and after World War II.

 

9. Vladimir Nabokov- Lolita

Lolita is a novel by Vladimir Nabokov, written in English and published in 1955 in Paris and 1958 in New York. It was later translated by its Russian-native author into Russian. The novel is notable for its controversial subject: the protagonist and unreliable narrator, middle-aged literature professor and hebephile Humbert Humbert, is obsessed with the 12-year-old Dolores Haze, with whom he becomes sexually involved after he becomes her stepfather. “Lolita” is his private nickname for Dolores.

 

8.  George Orwell- 1984

Nineteen Eighty-Four is a dystopian  novel by George Orwell published in 1949. The Oceanian province of Airstrip One is a world of perpetual war, omnipresent government surveillance, and public mind control, dictated by a political system euphemistically named English Socialism under the control of a privileged Inner Party elite that persecutes all individualism and independent thinking as thoughtcrimes.

 

7. Thomas Harris- The silence of the lambs

The Silence of the Lambs is a novel by Thomas Harris. First published in 1988, it is the sequel to Harris’ 1981 novel Red Dragon. Both novels feature the cannibalistic serial killer Dr. Hannibal Lecter, this time pitted against FBI Special Agent Clarice Starling.

 

6. Oscar Wilde- The picture of Dorian Gray

The Picture of Dorian Gray is the only published novel by Oscar Wilde, appearing as the lead story in Lippincott’s Monthly Magazine on 20 June 1890, printed as the July 1890 issue of this magazine. The novel tells of a young man named Dorian Gray, the subject of a painting by artist Basil Hallward. Basil is impressed by Dorian’s beauty and becomes infatuated with him, believing his beauty is responsible for a new mode in his art.

 

5. William Golding- Lord of the flies

Lord of the Flies is a novel by Nobel Prize-winning English author William Golding about a group of British boys stuck on an uninhabited island who try to govern themselves with disastrous results. Its stances on the already controversial subjects of human nature and individual welfare versus the common good earned it position 68 on the American Library Association’s list of the 100 most frequently challenged books of 1990–1999.

 

4. Emily Bronte- Wuthering heights

Wuthering Heights is a novel by Emily Brontë, written between October 1845 and June 1846, and published in 1847 under the pseudonym Ellis Bell. It was her first and only published novel: she died aged 30 the following year. The decision to publish came after the success of her sister Charlotte’s novel, Jane Eyre. After Emily’s death, Charlotte edited the manuscript of Wuthering Heights, and arranged for the edited version to be published as a posthumous second edition in 1850.

 

3. Nathaniel Hawthorne- The scarlet letter

The Scarlet Letter is an 1850 romantic work of fiction in a historical setting, written by Nathaniel Hawthorne. It is considered to be his magnum opus. Set in 17th-century Puritan Boston, Massachusetts during the years 1642 to 1649, it tells the story of Hester Prynne, who conceives a daughter through an adulterous affair and struggles to create a new life of repentance and dignity. Throughout the book, Hawthorne explores themes of legalism, sin, and guilt.

 

2. N.H. Kleinbaum- Dead poets society

Dead poets society is a book written by N. H. Kleinbaum and it is about the life of some teens. Set at the conservative and aristocratic Welton Academy in Vermont in 1959, it tells the story of an English teacher who inspires his students through his teaching of poetry.

 

1.Giovanni Papini- A man finished

A man finished is a book written by Giovanni Papini and it reffers to the mental landscape of a strange man. It is highly philosophical and psychological and it can change your perspective on life.

 

 

 

Top 10 most popular radio station in the world

Everyone loves listening to the radio. When the radio first appeared, it was like a revolution. Everything changed and radio had an important contribution even in politics and social matters.
10. KIIS-FM

KIIS-FM (102.7 FM) – branded 102.7 KIIS FM – is a commercial contemporary hit radio (CHR) radio station licensed to Los Angeles, California. Owned by Clear Channel Media and Entertainment, KIIS-FM (pronounced “Kiss FM”) is the origin of the KISS-FM brand, and currently serves as the flagship station for On Air with Ryan Seacrest.

9. BBC Radio 1

BBC Radio 1 is a British radio station operated by the British Broadcasting Corporationwhich also broadcasts internationally, specialising in current popular music and chart hits throughout the day. Radio 1 provides alternative genres after 7:00 pm, including electronic dance, hip hop, rock or interviews.

 

8. Star 94 Atlanta

WSTR FM 94.1 MHz (“Star 94”) is an Atlanta FM radio station airing an hot adult contemporary format. It is owned by Lincoln Financial Media, and has Smyrna, Georgia as its city of license. 94.1 was once WGST-FM and was given away in the 1950s as FM did not take off. In the 1960s, WDJK appeared to occupy 94.1 as a brand new station, associated with WYNX (AM-1550) in Smyrna.

 

7. Global Radio

This is Global Limited is a British media and publishing holding company, which owns a number of companies including Global Radio, the largest in the country following acquisitions of Chrysalis Radio, GCap Media and Real and Smooth (formerly GMG Radio).

 

6. WFMU

WFMU is a listener-supported, independent community radio station headquartered inJersey City, New Jersey, United States, broadcasting at 91.1 (at 90.1 as WMFU, and at 91.9 as W219DQ) MHz FM, presenting a freeform radio format. It is the longest-running freeform radio station in the U.S.

 

5. Jango

Jango is a free online music streaming service that allows users to create and share custom radio stations. Users choose artists to stream, and the station plays music from similar artists. Users can further refine their stations by rating songs and artists in their feed to play less or more frequently.

 

4. Soma FM

SomaFM is a listener-supported, commercial-free Internet-only streaming music station, which started broadcasting out of founder Rusty Hodge’s basement garage in theBernal Heights neighborhood of San Francisco. SomaFM broadcasts electronic music,indie rock and lounge music, among other genres.

 

3. Spectrum Radio

Spectrum Radio is a multi-ethnic radio station based in London, which covers over 20 different ethnic communities. Spectrum Radio broadcasts multicultural ethnic programming on three different broadcast platforms: on 558 kHz from the Crystal Palace transmitting station and DAB Digital Radio.

 

2. KEXP

KEXP-FM (90.3 FM) is a public radio station based in Seattle, Washington, that specializes in alternative and indie rock programmed by its disc jockeys. Its broadcasting license is owned by the University of Washington, which operates the station in a partnership with Paul Allen’s Experience Music Project. The station was formerly operated under the call letters KCMU.

 

1. P2

P2 is one of the four main radio channels operated by Sweden’s national publicly funded radio broadcasting organization Sveriges Radio (SR). It broadcasts music (principally classical music and jazz) and also carries educational programming as well as programmes in minority languages.

 

Top 10 Disney movies

Everybody loves Disney Movies. We all grew up with them and we learn various lessons from them. The visual interpretations of fairy tales, movies are more appealing to children nowadays.

10. Pocahontas

Pocahontas is a 1995 American animated epic musical romance-drama film and is the 33rd animated feature in the Walt Disney Animated Classics series. It was produced byWalt Disney Feature Animation and was originally released to select theaters on June 16, 1995 by Walt Disney Pictures. It belongs to the era known as the Disney Renaissance from 1989 to 1999.

 

9. The Hunchback of Notre Dame

The Hunchback of Notre Dame is a 1996 American animated musical drama filmproduced by Walt Disney Feature Animation and released to theaters on June 21, 1996 by Walt Disney Pictures. The 34th animated feature in the Walt Disney Animated Classics series, the film is based on Victor Hugo’s novel of the same name. The plot centers on Quasimodo, the deformed bell-ringer of Notre Dame and his struggle to gain acceptance into society.

 

8. Dumbo

Dumbo is a 1941 American animated film produced by Walt Disney Productions and released on October 23, 1941, by RKO Radio Pictures. Sound was recorded conventionally using the RCA System. One voice was synthesized using the Sonovoxsystem, but it, too, was recorded using the RCA System.

 

7. Monster’s University

Monsters University is a 2013 American 3D computer-animated comedy film produced by Pixar Animation Studios and released by Walt Disney Pictures. It was directed by Dan Scanlon and produced by Kori Rae. It is the fourteenth feature film produced by Pixar and is a prequel to 2001’s Monsters, Inc., marking the first time Pixar has made a prequel film.

 

 

6. Pinocchio

Pinocchio is a 1940 American animated musical fantasy film produced by Walt Disney Productions and based on the story The Adventures of Pinocchio by Carlo Collodi. It is the second animated feature film produced by Disney. Made after the success of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, Pinocchio was released to theaters by RKO Radio Pictureson February 7, 1940.

 

5. The Jungle Book

The Jungle Book is a 1967 American animated film produced by Walt Disney Productions and was released on October 18, 1967. It is the 19th animated feature in theWalt Disney Animated Classics series. It was inspired by the stories about the feral childMowgli from the book of the same name by Rudyard Kipling. Directed by Wolfgang Reitherman, it was the last to be produced by Walt Disney, who died during its production.

 

4. Peter Pan

Peter Pan is a 1953 American animated fantasy-adventure film produced by Walt Disneyand based on the play Peter Pan, or The Boy Who Wouldn’t Grow Up by J. M. Barrie. It is the 14th film in the Walt Disney Animated Classics series and was originally released on February 5, 1953 by RKO Pictures. Peter Pan is the final Disney animated feature released through RKO before Walt Disney’s founding of his own distribution company,Buena Vista Distribution, later in 1953 after the film was released.

 

3. Mulan

Mulan is a 1998 American animated musical action-comedy-drama film directed by Tony Bancroft and Barry Cook, with story by Robert D. San Souci and screenplay by Rita Hsiao, Philip LaZebnik, Chris Sanders, Eugenia Bostwick-Singer, and Raymond Singer. It was produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation and released by Walt Disney Pictures on June 19, 1998.

 

2. Tangled

Tangled is a 2010 American computer animated musical fantasy-comedy film produced by Walt Disney Animation Studios and released by Walt Disney Pictures. Loosely based on the German fairy tale “Rapunzel” in the collection of folk tales published by theBrothers Grimm, it is the 50th animated feature in the Walt Disney Animated Classicsseries.

 

1. Frozen

Frozen is a 2013 American 3D computer-animated musical fantasy-comedy filmproduced by Walt Disney Animation Studios and released by Walt Disney Pictures. It is the 53rd animated feature in the Walt Disney Animated Classics series. Loosely based on Hans Christian Andersen’s fairy tale The Snow Queen, and featuring the voices of Kristen Bell, Idina Menzel, Jonathan Groff, Josh Gad, and Santino Fontana, the film tells the story of a fearless princess who sets off on an epic journey alongside a rugged, thrill-seeking mountain man, his loyal pet reindeer, and a hapless snowman to find her estranged sister, whose icy powers have trapped the kingdom in eternal winter.

 

 

 

Top 10 wildest waterparks in the world

Did you know which are the most appreciated waterparks in the world? Well, people have voted some of them and they have been described as crazy, wild and a great adventure. Think about it next time you visit one.

10. Happy Magic

Beijing’s former Olympic aquatic center known as the Water Cube has been converted to a water park complete with an Aqualoop slide built by Whitewater West. The iconic building from the Summer Games is now festooned with enormous jellyfish and outsized water bubbles descending from the ceiling.

 


9. Area 47

The Austrian outdoor adventure area takes the water park concept to the extreme. Located along a river about 30 miles west of Innsbruck, Area 47 features a tower of water slides that feed into a body of water that can be traversed via rock climbing walls, rope courses and zip lines. Visitors can enter the water either by leaping from a 30-foot-tall diving platform, racing down a steep snowboard ramp or jumping from a rooftop onto an inflated Blobbing tube.


8. Yas Waterworld

The United Arab Emirates water park has an Arabian fantasy theme with a back story that celebrates the region’s pearl diving heritage. The $245 million Abu Dhabi water park features two water coasters, a pair of stationary wave machines, a looping slide, a water dropping suspended roller coaster and a SplashQuest interactive game.


7. Wet n’ wild

Wet n’ Wild Orlando is a great place to beat the Florida heat. The most popular ride, “The Brain Wash,” contains a 53-foot drop into a domed funnel.


6. Noah’s Ark

One of the largest water parks in the U.S., Noah’s Ark covers 70 acres and includes more than 60 waterslides. “Sting Ray,” one of the park’s most popular waterslides, resembles a giant half-pipe.


5. Canevaworld

It’s a park within a park. Canevaworld water park in Italy is nestled within a theme park called Movieland Studios. Even the brave of heart will think twice before plunging down “Stukas,” a 10-story tall water slide that’s almost perpendicular to the ground.

4. Sommarland

This Swedish water park contains plenty of theme park rides alongside its main attractions. Visitors can zoom down log flumes, watch water shows, and even ride airboats.


3. World Water Park

Tired of shopping? World Water Park in Edmonton, Canada is located in the Edmonton Mall. No matter what time of year, this indoor water park is always a pleasant 86 degrees Fahrenheit.


2. Adaland

This water park is truly a Turkish delight. There are more than 20 rides to choose from on the park’s 25 acres, including a tube slide called “Yellow Python” that rotates as riders speed down it.

1. Aquaventure

Guests of the Atlantis Resort in the Bahamas can access this 141-acre water park that contains over twenty million gallons of water. Those with a sense of adventure will appreciate the “Leap of Faith,” a 60-foot slide that propels riders down a replica of a legendary Mayan Temple and through a transparent tunnel in a shark-filled cove.

 

Top 10 amazing festivals all over the world

Here we present you ten of the most popular and fascinating festivals all over the world. This events represent their countries and gather people together, so it is a great opportunity to participate to any of the.

10. Chinese New Year

Chinese New Year is an important traditional Chinese holiday. In China, it is also known as the Spring Festival, the literal translation of the modern Chinese name. Chinese New Year celebrations traditionally ran from Chinese New Year’s Eve, the last day of the last month of the Chinese calendar, to the Lantern Festival on the 15th day of the first month, making the festival the longest in the Chinese calendar. Because the Chinese calendar is lunisolar, the Chinese New Year is often referred to as the “Lunar New Year”.

9. Holi Festival, India

Every year, thousands of Hindus participate in the festival Holi. The festival has many purposes. First and foremost, it celebrates the beginning of the new season, spring. Originally, it was a festival that commemorated good harvests and the fertile land. Hindus believe it is a time of enjoying spring’s abundant colours and saying farewell to winter. It also has a religious purpose, commemorating events present in Hinduism. During this event, participants hold a bonfire, throw coloured powder at each other, and celebrate wildly.

8. The Carnival of Rio de Janeiro

The Carnaval in Rio de Janeiro is a world famous festival held before Lent every year and considered the biggest carnival in the world with two million people per day on the streets. The first festivals of Rio date back to 1823. The typical Rio carnival parade is filled with revelers, floats and adornments from numerous samba schools which are located in Rio. A samba school is composed of a collaboration of local neighbours that want to attend carnival together, with some kind of regional, geographical common background.

7. Pingxi Lantern Festival, Taiwan

There are many activities all over Taiwan during Taiwan Lantern Festival. During the Taiwan Lantern Festival, thousands of sky lanterns light over Pingxi District in Taiwan. In Yanshui District, the firecrackers ceremony of Wumiao Temple is also one of the important activities. The Tainan Yanshui Fireworks Display (“beehive of fireworks”) was originally celebrated to ward of evil and disease from the town. The Taipei Pingshi Sky Lanterns were released originally to let others know that the town was safe. These lanterns are decorated with wishes and images relating to the owner.

6. Carnival of Venice, Italy

The Carnival of Venice is an annual festival, held in Venice, Italy. The Carnival ends with Lent, forty days before Easter on Shrove Tuesday (Fat Tuesday or Martedì Grasso), the day before Ash Wednesday. It is said that the Carnival of Venice was started from a victory of the “Serenissima Repubblica” against the Patriarch of Aquileia, Ulrico in the year 1162. In the honor of this victory, the people started to dance and make reunions in San Marco Square. Apparently, this festival started on that period and became official in the Renaissance. However, under the rule of the King of Austria, the festival was outlawed entirely in 1797 and the use of masks became strictly forbidden.

5. Desert Festival of Jeisalmer, India

Jaisalmer , nicknamed “The Golden city”, is a town in the Indian state of Rajasthan. It is located 575 kilometres (357 mi) west of the state capital Jaipur. It was once known as Jaisalmer state. The town stands on a ridge of yellowish sandstone, crowned by a fort, which contains the palace and several ornate Jain temples. Many of the houses and temples are finely sculptured. It lies in the heart of the Thar Desert (great Indian desert) and has a population of about 78,000. It is the administrative headquarters of Jaisalmer District.

4. Songkran Water Festival, Thailand

The Songkran festival is celebrated in Thailandas the traditional New Year’s Day from 13 to 15 April. It coincides with the New Year of many calendars of South and Southeast Asia.
The date of the festival was originally set by astrological calculation, but it is now fixed. If these days fall on a weekend, the missed days off are taken on the weekdays immediately following. Songkran falls in the hottest time of the year in Thailand, at the end of the dry season, so people throw water at each other and play.

3. San Firmin Festival, Spain

The festival of San Fermín in the city of Pamplona (Navarre, Spain), is a deeply rooted celebration held annually from 12:00, 6 July, when the opening of the party is marked by setting off the pyrotechnicchupinazo, to midnight 14 July, with the singing of the Pobre de Mí. While its most famous event is the encierro, or the running of the bulls, which happens at 8:00 am from July 7th to July 14th, the week long celebration involves many other traditional and folkloric events. It is known locally as Sanfermines and is held in honor of Saint Fermin, the co-patron of Navarre.

2. Obon Festival, Japan

Obon or just Bon is a Japanese Buddhist custom to honor the spirits of one’s ancestors. This Buddhist-Confucian custom has evolved into a family reunion holiday during which people return to ancestral family places and visit and clean their ancestors’ graves, and when the spirits of ancestors are supposed to revisit the household altars. It has been celebrated in Japan for more than 500 years and traditionally includes a dance, known as Bon-Odori.

1. Dia De Los Muertos, Mexico

Day of the Dead (Spanish: Día de Muertos) is a Mexican holiday celebrated throughout Mexico and around the world in other cultures. The holiday focuses on gatherings of family and friends to pray for and remember friends and family members who have died. It is particularly celebrated in Mexico, where it is a national holiday, and all banks are closed. The celebration takes place on November 1 and 2, in connection with the Catholic holidays of All Saints’ Day and All Souls’ Day. Traditions connected with the holiday include building private altars honoring the deceased using sugar skulls, marigolds, and the favorite foods and beverages of the departed and visiting graves with these as gifts. They also leave possessions of the deceased.

 

 

 

 

Top 10 most popular toys in the world

If you have to make a present to a kid, it shouldn’t be that hard. All children love toys and now you know which are the ten most popular and appreciated toys in the world. They will definitely love any of them.
10. Barbie doll

Barbie is a fashion doll manufactured by the American toy-company Mattel, Inc. and launched in March 1959. American businesswoman Ruth Handler is credited with the creation of the doll using a German doll called Bild Lilli as her inspiration.
Barbie is the figurehead of a brand of Mattel dolls and accessories, including other family members and collectible dolls.


9. Puzzle

A puzzle is a problem or enigma that tests the ingenuity of the solver. In a basic puzzle, one is intended to put together pieces in a logical way in order to come up with the desired solution. Puzzles are often contrived as a form of entertainment, but they can also stem from serious mathematical or logistical problems — in such cases, their successful resolution can be a significant contribution to mathematical research.

 

8. Lego

Lego is a popular line of construction toys manufactured by The Lego Group, a privately held company based in Billund, Denmark. The company’s flagship product, Lego, consists of colourful interlocking plastic bricks and an accompanying array of gears, minifigures and various other parts. Lego bricks can be assembled and connected in many ways, to construct such objects as vehicles, buildings, and even working robots. Anything constructed can then be taken apart again, and the pieces used to make other objects. Lego began manufacturing interlocking toy bricks in 1949.

 

7. Teddy bear

The teddy bear is a soft toy in the form of a bear. Developed apparently simultaneously by toymakers Morris Michtom in the US and Richard Steiff in Germany in the early years of the 20th century, and named after President Theodore “T.R.” Roosevelt, Jr., the teddy bear became an iconic children’s toy, celebrated in story, song and film.[1] Since the creation of the first teddy bears which sought to imitate the form of real bear cubs, “teddies” have greatly varied in form, style and material.

6. Toy train

A toy train is a toy that represents a train. It is distinguished from a model train by an emphasis on low cost and durability, rather than scale modeling. A toy train can be as simple as a pull toy that does not even run on track, or it might be operated by clockwork or a battery. Many toy trains blur the line between the two categories, running on electric power and approaching accurate scale.


5. Baby Born Doll

Baby Born is often considered to be the most lifelike of the series due to the numerous functions that the doll can perform which include Crying, Urinating and a pacifier which makes the dolls eyes shut in later versions, all of which can be performed without batteries making them safe to bathe. The most recent version includes 9 Functions and 10 accessories including a musical potty chair and designer bottle. Varieties include boy, girl and ethnic girl, each anatomically correct and having their own color style.


4. Robot toy

Mr. Machine is a once popular children’s mechanical toy originally manufactured by the Ideal Toy Company in 1960. Mr. Machine was a robot-like mechanical man wearing a top hat. The body had a giant windup key at the back. When the toy was wound up it would “walk”, swinging its arms and repeatedly ringing a bell mounted on its front; and after every few steps emit a mechanical “Ah!”, as if it were speaking. The toy stood about 18 inches tall (roughly 46 cm).

 

3. Toy car

A model car or toy car is a miniature representation of an automobile. Other miniature motor vehicles, such as trucks, buses, or even ATVs, etc. are often included in the general category of model cars. Because many miniature vehicles were originally sold as playthings, there is no precise difference between a model car and a toy car, yet the word ‘model’ implies either assembly required or some attempt at accurate rendering of an actual vehicle at smaller scale.


2. Monopoly

Monopoly is an American-originated board game originally published by Parker Brothers. Subtitled “The Fast-Dealing Property Trading Game,” the game is named after the economic concept of monopoly — the domination of a market by a single entity. It is currently published by the United States game and toy company Hasbro. Players move around the game board buying or trading properties, developing their properties with houses and hotels, and collecting rent from their opponents, the ultimate goal being to drive them into bankruptcy.


1. Rubik’s cube

Rubik’s Cube is a 3-D combination puzzle invented in 1974 by Hungarian sculptor and professor of architecture Ernő Rubik. Originally called the “Magic Cube”, the puzzle was licensed by Rubik to be sold by Ideal Toy Corp. in 1980 via German businessman Tibor Laczi and Seven Towns founder Tom Kremer, and won the German Game of the Yearspecial award for Best Puzzle that year. As of January 2009, 350 million cubes had been sold worldwide making it the world’s top-selling puzzle game. It is widely considered to be the world’s best-selling toy.

 

Top 10 most popular magazines in the world

We bet you like reading magazines, because it’s relaxing and informative. But did you know which are the most popular magazines in the world? Here we present you the top ten magazines that are most read on the Globe.
10. Esquire

Esquire is a men’s magazine, published in the U.S. by the Hearst Corporation. Founded in 1932, it flourished during the Great Depression under the guidance of founders Arnold Gingrich, David A. Smart and Henry L. Jackson. Esquire appeared, for the first time, in October 1933. Founded and edited by David A. Smart, Henry L. Jackson (who was killed in the crash of United Airlines Flight 624) and Arnold Gingrich; later transformed itself into a more refined periodical with an emphasis on men’s fashion and contributions by Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald,Alberto Moravia, André Gide and Julian Huxley.

9. Rolling Stone

Rolling Stone is a magazine published every two weeks that focuses on politics andpopular culture. In 1967, Rolling Stone was founded in San Francisco, California, byJann Wenner – who is still the magazine’s chief editor – and music critic, Ralph J. Gleason.
Rolling Stone was known for its musical coverage and for political reporting by the enigmatic and controversial gonzo journalist, Hunter S. Thompson. In the 1990s, the magazine changed its format to appeal to a younger readership interested in youth-oriented television shows, film actors, and popular music.

8. The New Yorker

The New Yorker is an American magazine of reportage, commentary, criticism, essays, fiction, satire, cartoons, and poetry. It is published by Condé Nast. Started as a weekly in 1925, the magazine is now published 47 times annually, with five of these issues covering two-week spans.
Although its reviews and events listings often focus on the cultural life of New York City,The New Yorker has a wide audience outside of New York. It is well known for its illustrated and often topical covers, its commentaries on popular culture and eccentricAmericana, its attention to modern fiction by the inclusion of short stories and literaryreviews, its rigorous fact checking and copyediting, its journalism on politics and social issues, and its single-panel cartoons sprinkled throughout each issue.


7. Forbes

Forbes is an American business magazine owned by Forbes, Inc. Published biweekly, it features original articles on finance, industry, investing, and marketing topics. Forbes also reports on related subjects such as technology, communications, science, and law. Its headquarters are in New York City. Primary competitors in the national business magazine category are Fortune and Bloomberg Businessweek. The magazine is well known for its lists, including its lists of the richest Americans (the Forbes 400), highest-paid stars under 30, and its list of billionaires.

6. Playboy

Playboy is an American men’s magazine that features photographs of nude women as well as journalism and fiction. It was founded in Chicago in 1953 by Hugh Hefner and his associates, and funded in part by a $1,000 loan from Hefner’s mother. The magazine has grown into Playboy Enterprises, Inc., with a presence in nearly every medium. Playboy is one of the world’s best known brands. In addition to the flagship magazine in the United States, special nation-specific versions of Playboy are published worldwide.


5. Sports Illustrated

Sports Illustrated is an American sports media franchise owned by media conglomerateTime Warner. Its self titled magazine has over 3.5 million subscribers and is read by 23 million adults each week, including over 18 million men. It was the first magazine with circulation over one million to win the National Magazine Award for General Excellence twice. Its swimsuit issue, which has been published since 1964, is now an annual publishing event that generates its own television shows, videos and calendars.

4. National Geographic

National Geographic, formerly the National Geographic Magazine, is the official magazine of the National Geographic Society. It published its first issue in 1888, just nine months after the Society itself was founded. There are 12 monthly issues of the National Geographic per year, plus additional map supplements. The Magazine is available in its traditional printed edition and through an interactive online edition. On occasion, special editions of the Magazine are issued. It contains articles about geography, popular science, history, culture, current events, and photography.


3. Vanity Fair

Vanity Fair is a magazine of pop culture, fashion, and current affairs published byCondé Nast. The present Vanity Fair has been published since 1983 and there have been editions for four European countries as well as the U.S. edition. This revived the title whose last title publication was February 1936 after a run from 1913. The current editor is Graydon Carter.


2. Vogue

Vogue is an American fashion and lifestyle magazine that is published monthly in 23 national and regional editions by Condé Nast. Vogue means “in style” in French. In 1892 Arthur Turnure founded Vogue as a weekly publication in the United States, sponsored by Kristoffer Wright. When he died in 1909, Condé Montrose Nastpicked up the magazine and slowly grew its publication. He changed it to a bi-weekly magazine and also started Vogueoverseas starting in the 1910s.


1. Cosmopolitan
Cosmopolitan is an international magazine for women. It was first published in 1886 in the United States as a family magazine, was later transformed into a literary magazine and eventually became a women’s magazine in the late 1960s. Also known as Cosmo, its content as of 2011 included articles on women’s issues, relationships, sex, health, careers, self-improvement, celebrities, fashion and beauty. Published by Hearst Magazines, Cosmopolitan has 64 international editions, is printed in 35 languages and is distributed in more than 100 countries.

 

Top 10 TV show series

 

Here are ten of the most popular TV series that you can watch this summer in your free time. You can see famous actors and find out interesting things from them. Let yourself be captivated and enjoy these amazing series.
10. Lie to me

Dr. Cal Lightman teaches a course in body language and makes an honest fortune exploiting it. He’s employed by various public authorities in various investigations, doing more when the police etc. fail to go the extra mile. So he can afford to constitute a team of his own, which like clients and others has to put up with his mind-games.

9. Prison Break

Due to a political conspiracy an innocent man is sent to death row and his only hope is his brother who makes it his mission to deliberately get himself sent to the same prison in order to break the both of them out from the inside out.

8. The Tudors

The Tudors is a historical fiction television series set primarily in sixteenth-century England, created by Michael Hirst and produced for the American premium cable television channel Showtime. The series, named after the Tudor dynasty, is loosely based upon the reign of King Henry VIII of England.

7. Supernatural

Two brothers follow their father’s footsteps as “hunters” fighting evil supernatural beings of many kinds including monsters, demons, and gods that roam the earth.

6. The Newsroom

The Newsroom is an American television political drama series created and principally written by Aaron Sorkin that premiered on HBO on June 24, 2012. The series chronicles the behind-the-scenes events at the fictional Atlantis Cable News (ACN) channel. It features an ensemble cast including Jeff Daniels as anchor Will McAvoy, who, together with his staff set out to put on a news show “in the face of corporate and commercial obstacles and their own personal entanglements.” Other cast members include Emily Mortimer, John Gallagher, Jr., Alison Pill, Thomas Sadoski, Dev Patel, Olivia Munn, and Sam Waterston.

 

5. Sex and the city

Four beautiful female New Yorkers gossip about their sex-lives (or lack thereof) and find new ways to deal with being a woman in the 90’s.

4. Suits

On the run from a drug deal gone bad, Mike Ross, a brilliant college-dropout, finds himself a job working with Harvey Specter, one of New York City’s best lawyers.

3. White Collar

White Collar is a USA Network television series created by Jeff Eastin, starring Matt Bomer as con-man Neal Caffrey and Tim DeKay as Special Agent Peter Burke. In exchange for his release from prison, Caffrey helps the FBI catch the most cunning White Collar criminals in New York. It premiered on October 23, 2009. In December 2009, White Collar was renewed for a second season that began on July 13, 2010. On September 27, 2010, the USA Network renewed White Collar for a third season with 16 new episodes, which premiered on June 7, 2011.

2. The Wire

The Wire is an American television drama series set and produced in and around Baltimore, Maryland. Created and primarily written by author and former police reporterDavid Simon, the series was broadcast by the premium cable network HBO in the United States. The Wire premiered on June 2, 2002, and ended on March 9, 2008, comprising 60 episodes over five seasons.

1. The Mentalist

The Mentalist is an American police procedural television series that debuted on September 23, 2008, on CBS. The show was created by Bruno Heller, who is also its executive producer. The show follows former “psychic” Patrick Jane (Simon Baker), who is a consultant to the California Bureau of Investigation (CBI), using the highly developed observational skills he previously employed to “read” people’s minds. On March 27, 2013, CBS renewed the series for a sixth season.

 

 

Top 10 designers in the world

Next time you wear designer clothes you will know about the person that created them. We present you ten of the most popular and rich designers in the world, that set the fashion all over the Globe.

10. Miuccia Prada

Prada was born in Milan, the youngest granddaughter of Mario Prada, founder of the eponymous company. According to: Forbes.com’s the World’s Richest People 2001: “She and her husband, Patrizio Bertelli, took over the family-owned luxury goods manufacturer in 1978. Since then, they’ve turned it into a fashion powerhouse, acquiring Jil Sander,Helmut Lang and shoemaker Church & Co.” Prada is a collector of contemporary art and owns several artworks by Young British Artists (YBAs) including Damien Hirst. In 2002, she opened a contemporary art space, Fondazione Prada, which exhibits work by various international artists. Prada announced the winner of the 2010 Turner Prize. She was listed as one of the fifty best-dressed over 50s by the Guardian in March 2013.

9. Calvin Klein

Calvin Klein Inc. is a fashion house founded by American fashion designer Calvin Klein. The company is headquartered in Midtown Manhattan, New York City and is currently owned by Phillips-Van Heusen. In 1968, Klein founded Calvin Klein Limited, a coat shop in the York Hotel in New York City, with $10,000.The first Calvin Klein collection was a line of “youthful, understated coats and dresses” featured at the New York City store, Bonwit Teller.
In September 1969, Klein appeared on the cover of Vogue magazine.

8. Roberto Cavalli

Roberto Cavalli (born 15 November 1940) is anItalian fashion designer from Florence. He is known for detailed exotic prints and for creating the sand-blasted look for jeans which are now a standard style for the majority of jean makers. He is the father of fashion designer Daniele Cavalli (b. 1986).

7. Donatella Versace
Donatella Versace (born 2 May 1955) is an Italian fashion designer and current Vice-President of the Versace Group, as well as chief designer. She owns 20 percent of the entire stock market assets of Versace. Her brother, Santo Versace, owns 30 percent. Donatella’s daughter Allegra Versace inherited 50% of the company stock after the death of Gianni Versace, Donatella’s brother and Versace’s founder.

6. Karl Lagerfeld

Karl Lagerfeld (born Karl Otto Lagerfeldt; 10 September 1935) is a German fashion designer, artist and photographer based in Paris. He is the head designer and creative director for the fashion house Chanel as well as the Italian house Fendi, in addition to having his own label fashion house. Over the decades he has collaborated on a variety of fashion and art related projects. He is well recognized around the world for his trademark white hair, black glasses, and high starched collars.


5. Vera Wang

Vera Ellen Wang(born June 27, 1949) is an American fashion designer based in New York City and former figure skater. She is known for her wide range of haute couture bridesmaid gowns and wedding gown collections, as well as for her clientele of elite ladies figure skaters, designing dresses for competitions and exhibitions.

4. Jean- Paul Gaultier

Jean Paul Gaultier ( born 24 April 1952 in Arcueil, Val-de-Marne, France) is a French haute couture and Pret-a-Porter fashion designer. Gaultier was the creative director of Hermès from 2003 to 2010. In the past, he has hosted the television series Eurotrash.

3. Marc Jacobs

Marc Jacobs (born April 9, 1963) is an American fashion designer. He is the head designer for Marc Jacobs, as well as Marc by Marc Jacobs, a diffusion line, with over 200 retail stores in 80 countries. He has been the creative director of the French design house Louis Vuitton since 1997. Jacobs was on Time magazine’s “2010 Time 100” list of the 100 most influential people in the world, and ranked number 14 on Out magazine’s 2012 list of  “50 Most Powerful Gay Men and Women in America”.

2. Carolina Herrera

Carolina Herrera (born January 8, 1939) is a Venezuelan-American fashion designer known for “exceptional personal style”,and dressing First Ladies from Jacqueline Onassis[4] to Michelle Obama. The New York Times cited her designs as “elegant and worldly without ever being fussy”.

1. Ralph Lauren

Ralph Lauren (born Ralph Lifshitz October 14, 1939 in New York City) is an Americanfashion designer and business executive, best known for his Polo Ralph Lauren clothing brand, and a global multi-billion-dollar enterprise. He has become well known for his collection of rare automobiles, some of which have been displayed in museum exhibits. As of September 2012, Forbes estimates his wealth at $6.5 billion dollars, which makes Ralph Lauren the 162nd richest person in the world.

 

 

Top 10 composers of all time

Everybody loves music, so why not find out more about the real geniuses of music and let yourself be enchanted by their great work. It will definitely relax you and make you dream.

10. Ludwig van Beethoven

Ludwig van Beethoven -baptized 17 December 1770 – 26 March 1827) was a Germancomposer and pianist. A crucial figure in the transition between the Classical and Romanticeras in Western art music, he remains one of the most famous and influential of all composers. His best known compositions include 9 symphonies, 5 concertos for piano, 32 piano sonatas, and 16 string quartets. He also composed other chamber music, choral works (including the celebrated Missa Solemnis), and songs.

9. Antonio Vivaldi

Antonio Lucio Vivaldi ( 4 March 1678 – 28 July 1741), nicknamed il Prete Rosso (“The Red Priest”) because of his red hair, was an Italian Baroque composer, Catholic priest, and virtuoso violinist, born in Venice. Recognized as one of the greatest Baroque composers, his influence during his lifetime was widespread over Europe. Vivaldi is known mainly for composing instrumental concertos, especially for the violin, as well as sacred choral works and over forty operas. His best known work is a series of violin concertos known as The Four Seasons.

8. Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky ( 7 May 1840 – 6 November 1893), anglicised as Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky , was a Russian composer whose works included symphonies, concertos, operas, ballets, chamber music, and a choral setting of the Russian Orthodox Divine Liturgy. Some of these are among the most popular theatrical music in the classical repertoire. He was the first Russian composer whose music made a lasting impression internationally, which he bolstered with appearances as a guest conductor later in his career in Europe and the United States. One of these appearances was at the inaugural concert of Carnegie Hall in New York City in 1891. Tchaikovsky was honored in 1884 by Emperor Alexander III, and awarded a lifetime pension in the late 1880s.

7. Claude Debussy

Achille-Claude Debussy(22 August 1862 – 25 March 1918) was a French composer. Along with Maurice Ravel, he was one of the most prominent figures associated with Impressionist music, though he himself intensely disliked the term when applied to his compositions.In France, he was made Chevalier of the Legion of Honour in 1903.A crucial figure in the transition to the modern era in Western music, he remains one of the most famous and influential of all composers.

6. Johann Sebastian Bach

Johann Sebastian Bach (31 March [O.S. 21 March] 1685 – 28 July 1750) was a German composer, organist, harpsichordist, violist, and violinist of the Baroque period. He enriched many established German styles through his skill in counterpoint, harmonic and motivicorganisation, and the adaptation of rhythms, forms, and textures from abroad, particularly from Italy and France. Bach’s compositions include the Brandenburg Concertos, the Mass in B minor, the The Well-Tempered Clavier, his cantatas, chorales, partitas, Passions, and organ works. His music is revered for its intellectual depth, technical command, and artistic beauty.

5. Richard Wagner
Wilhelm Richard Wagner (22 May 1813 – 13 February 1883) was a German composer, theatre director, polemicist, and conductor who is primarily known for his operas (or, as some of his later works were later known, “music dramas”). Unlike most opera composers, Wagner wrote both the libretto and the music for each of his stage works. Initially establishing his reputation as a composer of works in theromantic vein of Weber and Meyerbeer, Wagner revolutionised opera through his concept of the Gesamtkunstwerk (“total work of art”), by which he sought to synthesise the poetic, visual, musical and dramatic arts, with music subsidiary to drama, and which was announced in a series of essays between 1849 and 1852. Wagner realised these ideas most fully in the first half of the four-opera cycle Der Ring des Nibelungen (The Ring of the Nibelung).

4. Giuseppe Verdi

Giuseppe Fortunino Francesco Verdi ( 10 October 1813 – 27 January 1901) was an Italian Romantic composer primarily known for his operas. Verdi is considered with Richard Wagner the most influential composer of operas of the nineteenth century, and dominated the Italian scene after Bellini, Donizetti and Rossini. His works are frequently performed in opera houses throughout the world and, transcending the boundaries of the genre, some of his themes have long since taken root in popular culture, as “La donna è mobile” from Rigoletto, “Libiamo ne’ lieti calici” (The Drinking Song) from La traviata, “Va, pensiero” (The Chorus of the Hebrew Slaves) from Nabucco, the “Coro di zingari” from Il trovatore and the “Grand March” from Aida.

3. Franz Liszt

Franz Liszt ( October 22, 1811 – July 31, 1886), from 1859 to 1867 officially Franz Ritter von Liszt, was a 19th-century Hungarian composer, virtuoso pianist, conductor, teacher, and Franciscan. Liszt gained renown in Europe during the early nineteenth century for his virtuosic skill as a pianist. He was said by his contemporaries to have been the most technically advanced pianist of his age, and in the 1840s he was considered by some to be perhaps the greatest pianist of all time.

2. Frederic Chopin

Frédéric François Chopin (1 March or 22 February 1810– 17 October 1849), born (and known in Poland as) Fryderyk Franciszek Chopin,was a Polish composer and virtuoso pianist. He is widely considered one of the greatest Romantic piano composers. Chopin was born in Żelazowa Wola, a village in theDuchy of Warsaw. A renowned child prodigy, he grew up in Warsaw and completed his musiceducation there; he composed many of his mature works in Warsaw before leaving Poland in 1830 at age 20, shortly before the November 1830 Uprising.

1. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart ( 27 January 1756 – 5 December 1791), baptised as Johannes Chrysostomus Wolfgangus Theophilus Mozart,was a prolific and influential composer of theClassical era.
Mozart showed prodigious ability from his earliest childhood. Already competent onkeyboard and violin, he composed from the age of five and performed before European royalty. At 17, he was engaged as a court musician in Salzburg, but grew restless and travelled in search of a better position, always composing abundantly. While visiting Vienna in 1781, he was dismissed from his Salzburg position.