Top 10 Caribbean islands you would love to visit

The Caribbean Sea is a wonderful place surrounded by heavenly islands. Anyone would want to see this exotique and amazing places, because they are beautiful and natural, inspiring and extremely relaxing.

10. Cayman islands
The Cayman Islands are a British Overseas Territory in the western Caribbean Sea. The territory comprises the three islands of Grand Cayman, Cayman Brac and Little Cayman, south of Cuba and northwest of Jamaica. The Cayman Islands are considered to be part of the geographic Western Caribbean Zone as well as the Greater Antilles. The territory is a major world offshore financial centre.


9. Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Listeni is an island country in the Lesser Antilles Island arc, in the southern portion of the Windward Islands, which lie at the southern end of the eastern border of the Caribbean Sea where the latter meets the Atlantic Ocean. Its 389 km2 (150 sq mi) territory consists of the main island of Saint Vincent and the northern two-thirds of the Grenadines, which are a chain of smaller islands stretching south from Saint Vincent Island to Grenada.


8. Antigua and Barbuda
Antigua and Barbuda is a twin-island nation lying between the Caribbean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean. It consists of two major inhabited islands, Antigua and Barbuda, and a number of smaller islands (including Great Bird, Green, Guinea, Long, Maiden and York Islands and further south, the island of Redonda).


7. Anguilla
Anguilla is a British overseas territory in the Caribbean. It is one of the most northerly of the Leeward Islands in the Lesser Antilles, lying east of Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands and directly north of Saint Martin. The territory consists of the main island of Anguilla itself, approximately 16 miles (26 km) long by 3 miles (5 km) wide at its widest point, together with a number of much smaller islands and cays with no permanent population.


6. Bahamas
The Bahamas, officially the Commonwealth of the Bahamas, is an island country consisting of more than 700 islands, cays, and islets in the Atlantic Ocean; north of Cuba and Hispaniola (the Dominican Republic and Haiti); northwest of the Turks and Caicos Islands; southeast of the U.S. state of Florida and east of the Florida Keys. Its capital is Nassau on the island of New Providence.


5. Saint Lucia
Saint Lucia is a sovereign island country in the eastern Caribbean Sea on the boundary with the Atlantic Ocean. Part of the Lesser Antilles, it is located north/northeast of the island of Saint Vincent, northwest of Barbados and south of Martinique. It covers a land area of 617 km2 (238.23 sq mi) and has a population of 174,000 (2010). Its capital is Castries.


4. Aruba
Aruba is an island 33 kilometre long (20 mi) located about 1,600 kilometres (990 mi) west of the Lesser Antilles in the southern Caribbean Sea, located 27 kilometres (17 mi) north of the coast of Venezuela. Together with Bonaire and Curaçao, it forms a group referred to as the ABC islands. Collectively, Aruba and the other Dutch islands in the Caribbean are often called the Netherlands Antilles or the Dutch Caribbean.


3. Martinique
Martinique is an island in the Lesser Antilles in the eastern Caribbean Sea, with a land area of 1,128 square kilometres (436 sq mi) and a population of 386,486 inhabitants (as of Jan. 2013). Like Guadeloupe, it is an overseas region of France, consisting of a single overseas department. One of the Windward Islands, it is directly north of St. Lucia, northwest of Barbados, and south of Dominica.


2. Bonaire
Bonaire is a Caribbean island that, with the uninhabited islet of Klein Bonaire nestled in its western crescent, forms a special municipality (officially public body) of the Netherlands. Together with Aruba and Curaçao it forms a group known as the ABC islands located off the north coast of South America near western part of Venezuela.


1. Curacao
Curaçao is an island in the southern Caribbean Sea, off the Venezuelan coast, that forms part of the Dutch Caribbean. The Country of Curaçao (Dutch: Land Curaçao; Papiamento: Pais Kòrsou), which includes the main island plus the small, uninhabited island of Klein Curaçao (“Little Curaçao”), is a constituent country of the Kingdom of the Netherlands.


D1: The Caribbean Sea is a wonderful place surrounded by heavenly islands. Anyone would want to see this exotique and amazing places, because they are beautiful and natural, inspiring and extremely relaxing.
D2: Here we present you ten of the most beautiful Carribean Islands. They are always a good idea if you want to visit an amazing, exotique and warm place. So choose your favourite and go there your next vacation.

 

Top 10 greatest lakes all over the world

We present you ten of the most impressive, breath-taking lakes in the world. They will dazzle you with they beauty and make you contemplate nature.

10. Lake Nicaragua
Lake Nicaragua or Cocibolca or Granada is a vastfreshwater lake in Nicaragua of tectonic origin. With an area of 8,264 km2 (3,191 sq mi), it is the largest lake in Central America, the 19th largest lake in the world (by area) and the 9th largest in the Americas. It is slightly smaller than Lake Titicaca. With an elevation of 32.7 metres (107 ft) above sea level, the lake reaches a depth of 26 metres (85 ft). It is intermittently joined by the Tipitapa River to Lake Managua.


9. Lake Malawi
Lake Malawi (Lake Nyasa, or Lago Niassa in Mozambique), is an African Great Lakeand the southernmost lake in the East African Rift system, located between Malawi,Mozambique and Tanzania. The third largest and second deepest lake in Africa, it is also the ninth largest in the world. It is reportedly the habitat of more species of fish than any other body of freshwater, including more than 1000 species of cichlids, and was officially declared a reserve by the Government of Mozambique on June 10, 2011.

8. Lake Vanern
Vänern is the largest lake in Sweden, the largest lake in the European Union and the third-largest lake in Europe after Ladoga and Onega in Russia. It is located in the provinces of Västergötland, Dalsland, and Värmland in the southwest of the country.

7. Lake Kivu
Lake Kivu is one of the African Great Lakes. It lies on the border between theDemocratic Republic of the Congo and Rwanda, and is in the Albertine Rift, the western branch of the East African Rift. Lake Kivu empties into the Ruzizi River, which flows southwards into Lake Tanganyika. The name comes from kivu which means “lake” inBantu language, just like the words tanganyika or nyanza.

6. Lake Titicaca
Lake Titicaca is a lake in the Andes on the border of Peru and Bolivia. By volume of water, it is the largest lake in South America.Lake Maracaibo has a larger surface area, but is often regarded as a large brackish bay due to its direct connection with the sea.
It is often called the highest navigable lake in the world, with a surface elevation of 3,812 m (12,507 ft).Although this refers to navigation by large boats, it’s generally considered to mean commercial craft.


5. Lake Tanganyika

Lake Tanganyika is an African Great Lake. It is estimated to be the second largest freshwater lake in the world by volume, and the second deepest, in both cases, after onlyLake Baikal in Siberia; it is also the world’s longest freshwater lake. The lake is divided among four countries – Tanzania, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Burundi, andZambia, with Tanzania (46%) and the DRC (40%) possessing the majority of the lake. The water flows into the Congo River system and ultimately into the Atlantic Ocean.

4. Qinghai Lake
Qinghai Lake is the largest lake in China. Located in China’s Qinghaiprovince on an endorheic basin, Qinghai Lake is classified as a saline and alkaline lake. Both the current Chinese name “Qinghai” and the older Mongolian name Kokonurtranslate to “Blue Lake” or “Teal Sea”, are used in English. Qinghai Lake is located about 100 kilometres (62 mi) west of the provincial capital of Xining at 3,205 m (10,515 feet) above sea level in a depression of the Qinghai-Tibet plateau. Twenty-three rivers and streams empty into Qinghai Lake, most of them seasonal. Five permanent streams provide 80% of total influx.

3. Turkana Lake
Lake Turkana , formerly known as Lake Rudolf, is a lake in the Kenyan Rift Valley, with its far northern end crossing into Ethiopia. It is the world’s largest permanent desert lake and the world’s largest alkaline lake. By volume it is the world’s fourth-largest salt lake after the Caspian Sea, Issyk-Kul, andLake Van (passing the shrinking South Aral Sea), and among all lakes it ranks 24th. The water is potable, but not palatable. It supports a rich lacustrine wildlife. The climate is hot and very dry.

2. Michigan Lake
Lake Michigan is one of the five Great Lakes of North America and the only one located entirely within the United States. The other four Great Lakes are shared by the U.S. andCanada. It is the second largest of the Great Lakes by volume and the third largest by surface area, after Lake Superior and Lake Huron (and is slightly smaller than the U.S. state of West Virginia). To the east, its basin is conjoined with that of Lake Huron through the wide Straits of Mackinac, giving it the same surface elevation as its easterly counterpart; the two are technically a single lake.

1. Dead Sea Lake

The Dead Sea also called the Salt Sea, is a salt lake bordering Jordan to the east and Israel and theWest Bank to the west. Its surface and shores are 423 metres (1,388 ft) below sea level, Earth’s lowest elevation on land. The Dead Sea is 377 m (1,237 ft) deep, the deepest hypersaline lake in the world. With 33.7% salinity, it is also one of the world’s saltiest bodies of water, though Lake Assal (Djibouti), Garabogazköl and some hypersaline lakes of the McMurdo Dry Valleys in Antarctica (such as Don Juan Pond) have reported higher salinities. It is 8.6 times saltier than the ocean.

 

Top 10 cities you should visit in a lifetime

If you have free time and you don’t know what places you should choose to visit, we propose you some nice cities, some of them not so known.
10. Baku
Baku is the capital and largest city of Azerbaijan, as well as the largest city on the Caspian Sea and of the Caucasus region. It is located on the southern shore of the Absheron Peninsula, which projects into the Caspian Sea. The city consists of two principal parts: the downtown and the old Inner City (21.5 ha). Baku’s urban population at the beginning of 2009 was estimated at just over two million people.Officially, about 25 percent of all inhabitants of the country live in the metropolitan city area of Baku.


9. Osaka
Osaka is a city in the Kansai region of Japan’s main island of Honshu, a designated city under the Local Autonomy Law, the capital city of Osaka Prefecture and also the largest part of the Keihanshin metropolis, which comprises three major cities of Japan, Kyoto, Osaka and Kobe. Located at the mouth of the Yodo River on Osaka Bay, Osaka is Japan’s third largest city by population after Tokyo (special wards) and Yokohama.


8. Abu Dhabi
Abu Dhabi is the capital and the second largest city of the United Arab Emirates in terms of population and the largest of the seven member emirates of the United Arab Emirates. Abu Dhabi lies on a T-shaped island jutting into the Arab Gulf from the central western coast. The city proper had a population of 921,000 in 2013.


7. Sydney
Sydney is the state capital of New South Wales and the most populous city in Australia. It is on Australia’s south-east coast, on the Tasman Sea. In June 2010 the greater metropolitan area had an approximate population of 4.6 million people. Inhabitants of Sydney are called Sydneysiders, comprising a cosmopolitan and international population.


6. Monte Carlo
Monte Carlo officially refers to an administrative area of the Principality of Monaco, specifically the ward of Monte Carlo/Spélugues, where the Monte Carlo Casino is located. Informally the name also refers to a larger district, the Monte Carlo Quarter (corresponding to the former municipality of Monte Carlo), which besides Monte Carlo/Spélugues also includes the wards of La Rousse/Saint Roman, Larvotto/Bas Moulins, and Saint Michel. The permanent population of the ward of Monte Carlo is about 3,500, while that of the quarter is about 15,000. Monaco has four traditional quarters. From west to east they are: Fontvieille (the newest), Monaco-Ville (the oldest), La Condamine, and Monte Carlo.


5. Palermo
Palermo is a city in Insular Italy, the capital of both the autonomous region of Sicily and the Province of Palermo. The city is noted for its history, culture, architecture and gastronomy, playing an important role throughout much of its existence; it is over 2,700 years old. Palermo is located in the northwest of the island of Sicily, right by the Gulf of Palermo in the Tyrrhenian Sea.


4. Zadar
Zadar is a city in Croatia on the Adriatic Sea. It is the centre of Zadar County and the wider northern Dalmatian region. Zadar is a historical center of Dalmatia as well as the seat of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Zadar.


3. Bucharest
Bucharest is the capital municipality, cultural, industrial, and financial centre of Romania. It is the largest city in Romania, located in the southeast of the country, at 44°25′57″N 26°06′14″ECoordinates: 44°25′57″N 26°06′14″E, lies on the banks of the Dâmbovița River, less than 70 kilometres (43 mi) north of the Danube.


2. Los Angeles
Los Angeles , officially the City of Los Angeles, often known by its initials L.A., is the most populous city in the U.S. state of California and the second most populous in the United States, after New York City, with a population at the 2010 United States Census of 3,792,621. It has an area of 469 square miles (1,215 km2), and is located in Southern California.


1. Rio de Janeiro
Rio de Janeiro, commonly referred to simply as Rio, is the capital city of the State of Rio de Janeiro, the second largest city of Brazil, and the third largest metropolitan area and agglomeration in South America, boasting approximately 6.3 million people within the city proper, making it the 6th largest in the Americas, and 26th in the world. Part of the city has been designated as a World Heritage Site, named “Rio de Janeiro: Carioca Landscapes between the Mountain and the Sea”, identified by UNESCO on 1 July 2012 in the category Cultural Landscape.

Top 10 inventors of all time

This summer is time to find out more about science. There have been a lot of geniuses in this world that invented items we couldn’t live without. Present is what we see thanks to them. Let’s see 10 of the greatest minds of this world.
10. Nicolae Paulescu

10.Nicolae Constantin Paulescu (October 30, 1869 (O.S.) – July 17, 1931) was a Romanian physiologist, professor of medicine, the discoverer of pancreatine (later called insulin). The “pancreine” was a crude extract of bovine pancreas in salted water, after which some impurites were removed withhydrochloric acid and sodium hydroxide.

 

 

9. Dmitri Mendeleev

Dmitri Ivanovich Mendeleev (February 1834 – 2 February 1907 O.S. 27 January 1834 – 20 January 1907) was a Russian chemist and inventor. He formulated the Periodic Law, created his own version of the periodic table of elements, and used it to correct the properties of some already discovered elements and also to predict the properties of elements yet to be discovered.

 

 

8. Isaac Newton

Sir Isaac Newton  (25 December 1642 – 20 March 1727) was an English physicistand mathematician who is widely regarded as one of the most influential scientists of all time and as a key figure in the scientific revolution. His book Philosophiæ Naturalis Principia Mathematica (“Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy”), first published in 1687, laid the foundations for most of classical mechanics. Newton also made seminal contributions to optics and shares credit with Gottfried Leibniz for the invention of theinfinitesimal calculus.

 

 

7.Heinrich Hertz

Heinrich Rudolf Hertz (22 February 1857 – 1 January 1894) was a German physicist who clarified and expanded James Clerk Maxwell’s electromagnetic theory of light, which was first demonstrated by David Edward Hughes using non-rigorous trial and error procedures. Hertz is distinguished from Maxwell and Hughes because he was the first to conclusively prove the existence of electromagnetic waves by engineering instruments to transmit and receive radio pulses using experimental procedures that ruled out all other known wireless phenomena. The scientific unit of frequency – cycles per second – was named the “hertz” in his honor.

 

 

6. Roger Bacon

Roger Bacon, (c. 1214–1294) (scholastic accolade Doctor Mirabilis, meaning “wonderful teacher”), was an English philosopher and Franciscan friar who placed considerable emphasis on the study of nature through empirical methods. He is sometimes credited, mainly starting in the 19th century, as one of the earliest European advocates of the modern scientific method inspired by Aristotle and later Arabic scholars, such as those of Muslim scientist Alhazen.However, more recent reevaluations emphasize that he was essentially a medieval thinker, with much of his “experimental” knowledge obtained from books, in the scholastic tradition. A survey of the reception of Bacon’s work over centuries found it often reflects the concerns and controversies central to the receivers.

 

 

5. Louis Braille

Louis Braille (4 January 1809 – 6 January 1852) was the inventor of braille, a system of reading and writing used by people who are blind or visually impaired. As a small child, Braille was blinded in an accident; as a boy he developed a mastery over that blindness; and as a young man – still a student at school – he created a revolutionary form of communication that transcended blindness and transformed the lives of millions. After two centuries, the braille system remains an invaluable tool of learning and communication for the blind, and it has been adapted for languages worldwide.

 

 

4. Alexandru Ciurcu

Alexandru Ciurcu (29 January 1854, Şercaia –22 January 1922, Bucharest) was a Romanian inventor and publisher, famous for his invention with Just Buisson of a reaction engine. It used rocket propulsion and was successfully used to power to boat in 1886.[1] The two men envisioned that such motors would later be used for air travel.

 

 

3. Samuel Colt

Samuel Colt (July 19, 1814 – January 10, 1862) was an American inventor andindustrialist from Hartford, Connecticut. He was the founder of Colt’s Patent Fire-Arms Manufacturing Company (now known as Colt’s Manufacturing Company), and made the mass-production of  he revolver commercially viable for the first time.

 

 

 

2. Rudolf Diesel

Rudolf Christian Karl Diesel ( March 18, 1858 – September 29, 1913) was a German inventor and mechanical engineer, famous for the invention of the Diesel engine.

 

 

1. Johannes Gutenberg
Johannes Gensfleisch zur Laden zum Gutenberg (. 1395 – February 3, 1468) was a German blacksmith,goldsmith, printer, and publisher who introduced printing to Europe. His invention of mechanical movable type printing started the Printing Revolution and is widely regarded as the most important event of the modern period. It played a key role in the development of the Renaissance, Reformation, the Age of Enlightenment, and the Scientific Revolutionand laid the material basis for the modern knowledge-based economy and the spread of learning to the masses.

 

Top 10 most popular hotels in the world

If you are curious about how do the richest people in the world spend their vacations, here we present you ten of the most popular hotels and resorts in the world, also the most luxurious and expensive. Everybody dreams about spending time in this places that look like Heaven.

10. Taj Lake Palace, Udaipur, Rajasthan, India

The Taj is an 18th century palace situated on a manmade island in Lake Picola with a view of the Maharaja’s palace. Opulence and extravagance abound here with endless courtyards and corridors, stone inlay, gilt moldings and mirror. The many exclusive rooms and suites boast mosaics, stained-glass windows, silk bolsters and hand painted motifs.

 

9. Hotel Plaza Athenee, Paris, France

Built in 1911, with a view of the Eiffel Tower, this opulent luxury hotel is frequently named as France’s best. The rooms are overflowing with Art Deco, Regency and Louis XVI furnishings. The cuisine is out of this world thanks to world famous chef Alain Ducasse’s French restaurant featuring a 35,000-bottle wine cellar (ask for a private wine tasting).

 

8. The Venetian Resort and Casino, Las Vegas, United States

Towering above Las Vegas in shimmering white, the Venetian Resort and Casino is an outstanding hotel in a city famous for its outstanding hotels. Part hotel, part amusement park/fantasy world – the Venetian is one experience you will not soon forget. Features include the quarter mile long Grand Canal waterway complete with gondola rides and performances along the walkway, the 70,000 square foot Canyon Ranch spa, a 120,000 foot casino, the Grand Canal shopping center with 80 world class boutiques, Madam Tussaud’s famous wax museum, and entertainment by world class acts.

 

7. Le Sirenuse, Positano, Italy

Le Sirenuse, is a fabulously restored 18th-century villa with museum-quality antiques and hand-painted ceramic-tile floors. The 63-room hotel features an alfresco champagne-and-oyster bar, Aveda spa, and a small fleet of vintage wooden speedboats for sightseeing up and down the spectacular Amalfi coastline. Five-hundred candles are lit each night in its romantic restaurant overlooking the tiled dome of the town’s Renaissance church.

 

6. Trump International Hotel & Tower, New York, United States

Designed by Philip Johnson and Costas Kondyli, this super modern 52-story high rise is a Forbes five-star hotel with style to spare. Huge floor to ceiling windows provide an incredible view of Central Park. Features a five star French fusion restaurant on the main floor.

 

5. Mandarin Oriental, Hong Kong, China

The 130 year old Mandarin Oriental provides the perfect balance between East and West. High-tech wizardry next to old world charm and ambience. The floor-to-ceiling windows provide a stunning view of Victoria Harbor. The hotel prides itself on incredible service and even better food – wonderful modern French cuisine at the Pierre and legendary breakfast buffets.

4. Jumeirah Beach Hotel, Dubai

All the hotel’s 617 rooms, suites and villas are luxuriously furnished and provide spectacular views of the Arabian Gulf. And once you’ve finished taking in the view, you can choose from the widest array of leisure facilities around, including a scuba diving centre, five swimming pools, Sinbad’s Kids Club, The Hub for teens and complimentary, unlimited access to the Wild Wadi Water Park.

 

3. El Burj Al Arab, Dubai

Burj Al Arab is a luxury hotel located in Dubai,United Arab Emirates. At 321 m (1,053 ft), it is the fourth tallest hotel in the world. Burj Al Arab stands on an artificial island 280 m (920 ft) from Jumeirah beach and is connected to the mainland by a private curving bridge. The shape of the structure is designed to mimic the sail of a ship. Sometimes referred to as “the world’s only 7-Star hotel”, its star rating is disputed.


2. Cape Grace, South Africa

Situated in V & A Waterfront, Cape Grace Hotel & Spa is the perfect place to experience Cape Town and its surroundings. The hotel lies 0.5 km from the city center and provides accessibility to important town facilities. No less exceptional is the hotel’s easy access to the city’s myriad attractions and landmarks, such as Chavonnes Battery Museum, Cape Town Tourism Information Centre, Clock Tower.

1. Riad Kniza, Morocco

Located in Marrakech (Medina), Riad Kniza is close to Dar el Bacha Palace, Majorelle Garden, and Djemaa el Fna. Also nearby are Ben Youssef Mosque and Almoravid Koubba.
Dining options at this luxury riad include a restaurant and a bar/lounge. The staff can provide concierge services, tour/ticket assistance, and tour assistance. Additional amenities include spa services, a library, and multilingual staff. Guest parking is complimentary.


 

Top 10 campsites in the world

Here we present you ten of the most amazing campsites in the world. This kind of accomodation is more and more popular and everyone should try it at least once. It is and adventure that you will not regret.

10. Le val de cantobre, Aveyron, France

The Grands Causses Regional Park offers some of France’s most amazing panorama, including the Gorges du Tarn. This park campsite, in the grounds of a medieval farm, has a great view to the valley.

9. The Warren, Folkestone, Kent

The place has a tremendous view over the ocean, because it is situated at the top of the well-known white cliffs of Dover. There is also a separated pitch, romantic and ideal for a honeymoon.

8. Longitude 131 °, Central Australia

The beautiful tents in the center of the Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park in Australia give you the impression of luxury hotels. It is a very modern area that offers everything necessary while keeping the natural aspect.

7. Syke Farm, Cumbria

Buttermere is one of the most appealing area in the Lakes, and it makes you just lay down, contemplate and admire the scenery. It lies on the edge of the village and it is close to some pubs.

6. Playa Montroig Camping Resort, Tarragona, Spain

Located next to a sandy beach, it is an amazing location, fascinating with its tropical gardens and offers a lot of entertainment possibilities, like puppet shows, performances etc.

5. Cottar’s 1920 S Mara Safari Camp, Kenya

If you want nature and wilderness, you should choose this site. It makes you think of that old times where there was no technology and brings you closer to the human essence of life.

4. Oberoi Vanyavilas, India

Exotism and luxury in a natural environment, really close to a tiger reserve. It sounds like a lot of adrenaline, but it is an unique and amazing experience. There are gardens and even a spa for relaxation.

 

3. Troytown Farm, Isles of Scilly

This place is situated in the remotest part of St Agnes, which is the most remote island of Sicily. In is on the edge of a water and you have to be picked by a tractor in order to go there.


2. Bosworth water trust, Warwickshire

This location is ideal for family trips and there are a lot of available activities lile fishing, windsurfing and sailing. There is plenty of space for playing games and close to a bar.


1. Three Cliffs Bay, Gower

The position of this site is spectacular, because you can see the Gower coastline. The beach is easy to access and it is close to a parking area. An inspiring and relaxing place, ideal for special vacations.

 

Top 10 most amazing churches on Earth

Find out more about some of the most beautiful churches in the world, so when you have the chance to visit them, you will know something about them. They represent the culture, history and spirituality of their countries.

10. Note Dame de Paris

Notre-Dame de Paris ( French for “Our Lady of Paris”), also known as Notre-Dame Cathedral or simply Notre-Dame, is an historic Roman Rite Catholic Marian cathedral on the eastern half of the Île de la Cité in the fourth arrondissement of Paris, France.[2] The cathedral is widely considered to be one of the finest examples of French Gothic architecture and among the largest and most well-known church buildings in the world. Thenaturalism of its sculptures and stained glass are in contrast with earlierRomanesque architecture.


9. Las Lajas Sanctuary

Las Lajas Sanctuary is a basilica churchlocated in the southern Colombian Department of Nariño, municipality of Ipialesand built inside the canyon of the Guáitara River.
The present church was built in Gothic Revival style between 1916 and 1949. The name Laja comes from the name of a type of flat sedimentary rock similar toshale.

8. Hallgrimskirkja Cathedral

Hallgrímskirkja ( church of Hallgrímur) is a Lutheran(Church of Iceland) parish church in Reykjavík, Iceland. At 74.5 metres (244 ft), it is the largest church in Iceland and the sixth tallest architectural structure in Iceland after Longwave radio mast Hellissandur, the radio masts of US Navy at Grindavík, Eiðar longwave transmitter andSmáratorg tower. The church is named after the Icelandic poet and clergyman Hallgrímur Pétursson (1614 to 1674), author of the Passion Hymns.

7. Faisal Mosque

The Faisal Mosque is the largest mosque in Pakistan, located in the national capital city of Islamabad. Completed in 1986, it was designed by Turkish architect Vedat Dalokay to be shaped like a desert Bedouin’s tent.
It is situated at the north end of Faisal Avenue, putting it at the northernmost end of the city and at the foot of Margalla Hills, the westernmost foothills of the Himalayas. It is located on an elevated area of land against a picturesque backdrop of the Margalla Hills. This enviable location represents the mosque’s great importance and allows it to be seen from miles around day and night.

6. Al Fateh Mosque

The Al-Fateh Mosque (also known as Al-Fateh Islamic Center & Al Fateh Grand Mosque) is one of the largest mosques in the world, encompassing 6,500 square meters and having the capacity to accommodate over 7,000 worshippers at a time. The mosque was built by the late Sheikh Isa ibn Salman Al Khalifa in 1987 and was named afterAhmed Al Fateh, the conqueror of Bahrain. In 2006, Al-Fateh became the site of the National Library of Bahrain.


5. Crystal Mosque

The Crystal Mosque or Masjid Kristal is a mosque in Kuala Terengganu,Terengganu, Malaysia. A grand structure made of steel, glass and crystal. The mosque is located at Islamic Heritage Park on the island of Wan Man. The mosque was constructed between 2006 and 2008. It was officially opened on 8 February 2008 by 13th Yang di-Pertuan Agong, Sultan Mizan Zainal Abidin ofTerengganu. It has the capacity to accommodate over 1,500 worshipers at a time. This is one of the most beautiful mosques in the world.


4. Sagrada Familia

The Basílica i Temple Expiatori de la Sagrada Família (English:Basilica and Expiatory Church of the Holy Family ), commonly known as the Sagrada Família , is a large Roman Catholic church in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain, designed by Catalan architect Antoni Gaudí (1852–1926). Although incomplete, the church is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and in November 2010Pope Benedict XVI consecrated and proclaimed it a minor basilica, as distinct from a cathedral which must be the seat of a bishop.


3. Segovia Cathedral

Segovia Cathedral is a Roman Catholic religious church in Segovia, Spain. It is located in the main square of the city, the Plaza Mayor, and is dedicated to the Virgin Mary. The massive cathedral was built between 1525-1577 in a late Gothic style, an architectural style that was becoming retardataire elsewhere in Europe. The prior cathedral of Segovia had stood adjacent to the Alcazar, and had been used by the besieged royal armies in their defense.


2. St. Peter’s Basilica

St. Peter’s Basilica is a Late Renaissance church located within Vatican City.
Designed principally by Donato Bramante, Michelangelo, Carlo Madernoand Gian Lorenzo Bernini, St. Peter’s is the most renowned work of Renaissance architecture and remains one of the largest churches in the world. While it is neither the mother church of the Roman Catholic Church nor the cathedral of the Bishop of Rome, St. Peter’s is regarded as one of the holiest Catholic sites. It has been described as “holding a unique position in the Christian world” and as “the greatest of all churches of Christendom”.


1. St. Basil’s Cathedral

The Cathedral of the Protection of Most Holy Theotokos on the Moat or Pokrovsky Cathedral are official names for a Russian Orthodox church in Red Square in Moscow.The church is also called the Cathedral of St. Vasily the Blessed (Russian: Собор Василия Блаженного), anglicized as Saint Basil’s Cathedral. It was built from 1555–61 on orders from Ivan the Terrible and commemorates the capture of Kazan and Astrakhan.

 

Top 10 most amazing and dangerous volcanoes in the world

Nature is most powerful than any weapon human being has created. It can destroy us really fast if we don’t respect and protect it. Here we present you ten of the most amazing and dangerous volcanoes all over the world. It’s something interesting to know more about.

10. Popocatepetl

Popocatépetl is an activevolcano located in the states of Puebla, State of Mexico, and Morelos, in Central Mexico, and lies in the eastern half of the Trans-Mexican volcanic belt. At 5,426 m (17,802 ft) it is the second highest peak in Mexico, after the Pico de Orizaba at 5,636 m (18,491 ft).
It is linked to the Iztaccihuatl volcano to the north by the high saddle known as the Paso de Cortés.

9. Mount Vesuvius

Mount Vesuvius (Italian: Monte Vesuvio, Latin: Mons Vesuvius) is a stratovolcanoin the Gulf of Naples, Italy, about 9 kilometres (5.6 mi) east of Naples and a short distance from the shore. It is one of several volcanoes which form the Campanian volcanic arc. Vesuvius consists of a large cone partially encircled by the steep rim of a summit caldera caused by the collapse of an earlier and originally much higher structure.
Mount Vesuvius is best known for its eruption in AD 79 that led to the burying and destruction of the Roman cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum.

8. Mount Bromo

Mount Bromo (Indonesian: Gunung Bromo), is an active volcano and part of theTengger massif, in East Java, Indonesia. At 2,329 metres (7,641 ft) it is not the highest peak of the massif, but is the most well known. The massif area is one of the most visited tourist attractions in East Java, Indonesia. The volcano belongs to the Bromo Tengger Semeru National Park. The name of Bromo derived fromJavanese pronunciation of Brahma, the Hindu creator god.

7. Krakatoa

Krakatoa, or Krakatau (Indonesian: Krakatau), is a volcanic island situated in the Sunda Strait between the islands of Java and Sumatra in Indonesia. The name is also used for the surrounding island group and the volcanoes as a whole. The Krakatoa volcanoes erupted and exploded in 1883, causing massive tsunamis and killing at least 36,417 people, while simultaneously destroying over two-thirds of Krakatoa island. The explosion is considered to be the loudest sound ever heard in modern history, with reports of it being heard up to 3,000 miles (4,800 km) from its point of origin.


6. Mount Etna

Mount Etna is an activestratovolcano on the east coast of Sicily, Italy, close to Messina and Catania. It lies above the convergent plate margin between the African Plate and the Eurasian Plate. It is the tallest active volcano on the European continent, currently standing 3,329 m (10,922 ft) high, though this varies with summit eruptions. It is the highest mountain in Italy south of the Alps. Etna covers an area of 1,190 km2 (459 sq mi) with a basal circumference of 140 km.


5. Kilauea

Kīlauea is a shield volcano in theHawaiian Islands, the most active of the five volcanoes that together form the island of Hawaiʻi. Located along the southern shore of the island, the volcano, at 300,000 to 600,000 years old, is the second youngest product of the Hawaiian hotspot and the current eruptive center of the Hawaiian–Emperor seamount chain. Because it lacks topographic prominence and its activities historically coincided with those of Mauna Loa, Kīlauea was once thought to be a satellite of its much larger neighbor.

4. Mauna Loa

Mauna Loa is one of five volcanoes that form the Island of Hawaii in the U.S. state of Hawaiʻi in the Pacific Ocean, and the largest on Earth in terms of volume and area covered. It is an active shield volcano, with a volume estimated at approximately 18,000 cubic miles (75,000 km3), although its peak is about 120 feet (37 m) lower than that of its neighbor, Mauna Kea. The Hawaiian name “Mauna Loa” means “Long Mountain”.

3. Mayon Volcano

Mayon Volcano, also known as Mount Mayon, is an active volcano in theprovince of Albay, on the island of Luzon in the Philippines. Renowned as the “perfect cone” because of its almost symmetric conical shape, Mayon forms the northern boundary of Legazpi City, the largest city in terms of population in the Bicol Region. The mountain was first declared as a national park and a protected landscape on July 20, 1938 in the country. It was reclassified and renamed as Mayon Volcano Natural Park in the year 2000.

2. Mount Fuji

Mount Fuji, located on Honshu Island, is the highest mountain in Japan at 3,776.24 m (12,389 ft). An activestratovolcano that last erupted in 1707–08, Mount Fuji lies about 100 kilometres (60 mi) south-west of Tokyo, and can be seen from there on a clear day. Mount Fuji’s exceptionally symmetrical cone, which is snow-capped several months a year, is a well-known symbol of Japan and it is frequently depicted in art and photographs, as well as visited by sightseers and climbers.


1. Mount Kilimanjaro

Kilimanjaro, with its three volcanic cones, Kibo, Mawenzi, and Shira, is a dormant volcanic mountain in Kilimanjaro National Park, Kilimanjaro Region,Tanzania. It is the highest mountain in Tanzania, the highest mountain in Africa, and the highest free-standing mountain in the world at 5,895 metres or 19,341 feet above sea level (the Uhuru Peak/Kibo Peak).

 

 

Top 10 statues all over the world

We present you ten of the most appreciated statues all over the world. You can contemplate them and understand more about their architecture, their meaning and the country they are in, because they represent it.

 

10. The Sphinx

The Great Sphinx of Giza, commonly referred to as the Sphinx, is a limestone statue of a reclining or couchant sphinx (a mythical creature with a lion’s body and a human head) that stands on the Giza Plateau on the west bank of the Nile in Giza, Egypt.
It is the largest monolith statue in the world, standing 73.5 metres (241 ft) long, 19.3 metres (63 ft) wide, and 20.22 m (66.34 ft) high. It is the oldest known monumental sculpture, and is commonly believed to have been built by ancient Egyptians of the Old Kingdom during the reign of the Pharaoh Khafra(c. 2558–2532 BC).

9. The Pieta

The Pietà (1498–1499) is a masterpiece of Renaissance sculpture byMichelangelo Buonarroti, housed in St. Peter’s Basilica in Vatican City. It is the first of a number of works of the same theme by the artist. The statue was commissioned for the French cardinal Jean de Billheres, who was a representative in Rome. The sculpture, in Carrara marble, was made for the cardinal’s funeral monument, but was moved to its current location, the first chapel on the right as one enters the basilica, in the 18th century. It is the only piece Michelangelo ever signed.

8. Tian Tan Buddha

Tian Tan Buddha, also known as the Big Buddha, is a large bronze statue of a BuddhaAmoghasiddhi, completed in 1993, and located at Ngong Ping, Lantau Island, in Hong Kong, China. The statue is located near Po Lin Monastery and symbolises the harmonious relationship between man and nature, people and religion. It is a major centre of Buddhismin Hong Kong, and is also a popular tourist attraction.


7. Virgen de Quito

In 1976, the Spanish artist Agustín de la Herrán Matorras was commissioned by the religious order of the Oblatesto build a 45-metre-tall aluminum monument of amadonna which was assembled on a high pedestal on the top of Panecillo. It is made of seven thousand pieces of aluminium. The monument was inaugurated on March 28, 1976, by the 11th archbishop of Quito,Pablo Muñoz Vega. The statue was engineered and erected by Anibal Lopez of Quito.


6. Motherland Calls

The Motherland Calls , also called Mother Motherland, Mother Motherland Is Calling, simply The Motherland, or The Mamayev Monument, is a statue in Mamayev Kurgan inVolgograd, Russia, commemorating the Battle of Stalingrad. It was designed by sculptor Yevgeny Vuchetich and structural engineer Nikolai Nikitin. Declared the largest statue in the world in 1967, it is the last non-religious statue to be declared the largest; every record holder since has been a Buddhism-related sculpture.


5. Maitreya Beopjusa

Golden Maitreya Statue of National Unification at Beopjusa is a 33-meter-high, 160-ton Buddha covered in 80kg of gold leaf erected in 1990 at a cost of $4 million.
Beopjusa , initially constructed in 553, is a head temple of the Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism situated on the slopes of Songnisan in Naesongni-myeon, Boeun County, in the province of Chungcheongbuk-do, South Korea.

4. Mount Nemrut

The mountain lies 40 km (25 mi) north of Kahta, near Adıyaman. In 62 BC, KingAntiochus I Theos of Commagene built on the mountain top a tomb-sanctuary flanked by huge statues (8–9 m or 26–30 ft high) of himself, two lions, two eagles and variousGreek, Armenian, and Iranian gods, such as Hercules-Vahagn, Zeus-Aramazd or Oromasdes (associated with the Iranian god Ahura Mazda), Tyche, and Apollo-Mithras. These statues were once seated, with names of each god inscribed on them. The heads of the statues have at some stage been removed from their bodies, and they are now scattered throughout the site.

3. Moai

Moai are monolithic human figures carved by theRapa Nui people from rock on the Chilean Polynesian island of Easter Islandbetween the years 1250 and 1500. Nearly half are still at Rano Raraku, the main moai quarry, but hundreds were transported from there and set on stone platforms called ahu around the island’s perimeter. Almost all moai have overly large heads three-eighths the size of the whole statue. The moai are chiefly the living faces (aringa ora) of deified ancestors (aringa ora ata tepuna).The statues still gazed inland across their clan lands when Europeans first visited the island, but most were cast down during later conflicts between clans.

2. Statue of Liberty

The Statue of Liberty is a colossal neoclassical sculpture on Liberty Island in the middle of New York Harbor, in Manhattan, New York City. The statue, designed by Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi and dedicated on October 28, 1886, was a gift to the United States from thepeople of France. The statue is of a robed female figure representing Libertas, theRoman goddess of freedom, who bears a torch and a tabula ansata (a tablet evoking the law) upon which is inscribed the date of the American Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1776. A broken chain lies at her feet. The statue is an icon of freedom and of the United States: a welcoming signal to immigrants arriving from abroad.


1. Christ the Redeemer

Christ the Redeemer is a statue of Jesus Christ in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; considered the largest Art Deco statue in the world and the 5th largest statue of Jesus in the world. It is 30 metres (98 ft) tall, not including its 8 metres (26 ft) pedestal, and its arms stretch 28 metres (92 ft) wide. It weighs 635 tonnes (625 long, 700 short tons), and is located at the peak of the 700-metre (2,300 ft) Corcovado mountain in the Tijuca Forest National Park overlooking the city. A symbol of Brazilian Christianity, the statue has become an icon for Rio de Janeiro and Brazil.

 

 

 

Top 10 most famous and powerful women of all time

All these women have contributed to the world we live in right now. We should know a little more about them and respect them for what they did. We have them as a source of inspiration for our dreams and goals in this world.

10. Cleopatra

Cleopatra VII Philopator Late 69 BC– August 12, 30 BC), known to history as Cleopatra, was the last pharaoh of Ancient Egypt. She was a member of the Ptolemaic dynasty, a family of Greek origin that ruled Egypt after Alexander the Great’s death during the Hellenistic period. The Ptolemies, throughout their dynasty, spoke Greek and refused to speak Egyptian, which is the reason that Greek as well as Egyptian languages were used on official court documents such as the Rosetta Stone. By contrast, Cleopatra did learn to speak Egyptian and represented herself as the reincarnation of an Egyptian goddess, Isis.

 

9. Joan of Arc

Joan of Arc (ca. 1412 – 30 May 1431), nicknamed “The Maid of Orléans” (French: La Pucelle d’Orléans), is a folk heroine of France and a Roman Catholic saint. She was born a peasant girl in what is now eastern France. Claiming divine guidance, she led the French army to several important victories during the Hundred Years’ War, which paved the way for the coronation of Charles VII of France. She was captured by the Burgundians, transferred to the English in exchange for money, put on trial by the pro-English Bishop of Beauvais Pierre Cauchon for charges of “insubordination and heterodoxy”, and was burned at the stake for heresy when she was 19 years old.

8. Elizabeth I

Elizabeth I (7 September 1533 – 24 March 1603) was queen regnant of England andIreland from 17 November 1558 until her death. Sometimes called “The Virgin Queen”, “Gloriana” or “Good Queen Bess”, Elizabeth was the fifth and last monarch of the Tudor dynasty. The daughter of Henry VIII, she was born into the royal succession, but her mother, Anne Boleyn, was executed two and a half years after her birth, and Elizabeth was declared illegitimate. On his death in 1553, her half-brother, Edward VI, bequeathed the crown to Lady Jane Grey, cutting his two half-sisters, Elizabeth and the Roman Catholic Mary, out of the succession in spite of statute law to the contrary. His will was set aside, Mary became queen, and Lady Jane Grey was executed. In 1558, Elizabeth succeeded her half-sister, during whose reign she had been imprisoned for nearly a year on suspicion of supporting Protestant rebels.

7. Marie Curie

Marie Curie (7 November 1867 – 4 July 1934), née Maria Salomea Skłodowska was a Polish physicist and chemist, working mainly in France,[2] who is famous for her pioneering research on radioactivity. She was the first woman to win a Nobel Prize, the only woman to win in two fields, and the only person to win in multiple sciences. She was also the first female professor at theUniversity of Paris (La Sorbonne), and in 1995 became the first woman to be entombed on her own merits in Paris’ Panthéon.

6. Mother Teresa

The Blessed Teresa of Calcutta, M.C., commonly known as Mother Teresa (26 August 1910 – 5 September 1997), was an Albanian born, Indian Roman CatholicReligious Sister.
Mother Teresa founded the Missionaries of Charity, a Roman Catholic religious congregation, which in 2012 consisted of over 4,500 sisters and is active in 133 countries. They run hospices and homes for people with HIV/AIDS, leprosy and tuberculosis; soup kitchens; children’s and family counseling programmes; orphanages; and schools. Members of the order must adhere to the vows of chastity, poverty and obedience, and the fourth vow, to give “Wholehearted and Free service to the poorest of the poor”.

5. Coco Chanel
Gabrielle “Coco” Bonheur Chanel (19 August 1883 – 10 January 1971) was a Frenchfashion designer and founder of the Chanel brand. She was the only fashion designer to appear on Time magazine’s list of the 100 most influential people of the 20th century. Along with Paul Poiret, Chanel was credited with liberating women from the constraints of the “corseted silhouette” and popularizing the acceptance of a sportive, casual chic as the feminine standard in the post-World War I era. A prolific fashion creator, Chanel’s influence extended beyond couture clothing. Her design aesthetic was realized in jewelry,handbags, and fragrance. Her signature scent, Chanel No. 5, has become an iconic product.

4. Simone de Beauvoir

Simone-Lucie-Ernestine-Marie Bertrand de Beauvoir, commonly known as Simone de Beauvoir (French: [simɔn də bovwaʁ]; 9 January 1908 – 14 April 1986), was a French writer, intellectual, existentialist philosopher, political activist, feminist, and social theorist. While she did not consider herself a philosopher, Beauvoir had a significant influence on both feminist existentialism and feminist theory.[1] Beauvoir wrote novels, essays, biographies, an autobiography, monographs on philosophy, politics, and social issues. She is best known for her novels, including She Came to Stay and The Mandarins, as well as her 1949 treatise The Second Sex, a detailed analysis of women’s oppression and a foundational tract of contemporary feminism.

3. Margaret Thatcher

Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG OM PC FRS (née Roberts, 13 October 1925 – 8 April 2013) was a British politician who was the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1979 to 1990 and the Leader of the Conservative Party from 1975 to 1990. She was the longest-serving British Prime Minister of the 20th century and is the only woman to have held the office. A Soviet journalist called her the “Iron Lady”, a nickname that became associated with her uncompromising politics and leadership style. As Prime Minister, she implemented policies that have come to be known as Thatcherism.

2. Anne Frank
Annelies “Anne” Marie Frank (12 June 1929 – early March 1945) is one of the most discussed Jewish victims of the Holocaust. Her diaryhas been the basis for several plays and films. Born in the city of Frankfurt am Main in Weimar Germanz, she lived most of her life in or near Amsterdam, in the Netherlands. Born a German national, Frank lost her citizenship in 1941. She gained international fame posthumously after her diary was published. It documents her experiences hiding during the German occupation of the Netherlands in World War II.

1. Eleanor Roosevelt

Anna Eleanor Roosevelt (October 11, 1884 — November 7, 1962) was the longest-serving First Lady of the United States, holding the post from 1933 to 1945 during her husband President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s four terms in office. PresidentHarry S. Truman later called her the “First Lady of the World” in tribute to her human rightsachievements.
Born into a wealthy and well-connected New York family, the Roosevelts, Eleanor had an unhappy childhood, suffering the deaths of both parents and one of her brothers at a young age. At 15, she attended Allenwood Academy in London, and was deeply influenced by feminist headmistress Marie Souvestre.