Top 10 endangered animal species

Everybody loves animals, but we have to show that love and to protect them, especially the endangered species. Now you can find out more about ten of the most important endangered species and why are them so important to our natural ballance.
10. Chinese giant salamander

The Chinese giant salamander (Andrias davidianus) is the largest salamander and largest amphibian in the world, reaching a length of 180 cm (6 ft), although it rarely – if ever – reaches that size today. It is endemic to rocky, mountain streams and lakes inChina, as well as Taiwan, probably as a result of introduction. It is consideredcritically endangered due to habitat loss, pollution, and overcollection, as it is considered a delicacy and used in folk medicine. It has been listed as one of the top 10 “focal species” in 2008 by the Evolutionarily Distinct and Globally Endangered (EDGE) project.


9. Siberian tiger

The Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica), also known as the Amur tiger, is a tigersubspecies inhabiting mainly the Sikhote Alin mountain region with a small subpopulation in southwest Primorye province in the Russian Far East. In 2005, there were 331–393 adult-subadult Amur tigers in this region, with a breeding adult population of about 250 individuals. The population has been stable for more than a decade due to intensive conservation efforts, but partial surveys conducted after 2005 indicate that the Russian tiger population is declining.


8. Leatherback sea turtle

The leatherback sea turtle (Dermochelys coriacea), sometimes called the lute turtle, is the largest of all living turtles (as well as the largest extant sea turtle) and is the fourth largest modern reptile behind three crocodilians. It is the only living species in the genusDermochelys. It can easily be differentiated from other modern sea turtles by its lack of abony shell. Instead, its carapace is covered by skin and oily flesh. Dermochelys coriacea is the only extant member of the family Dermochelyidae.


7. Addax

The addax (Addax nasomaculatus), also known as the white antelope and the screwhorn antelope, is an antelope of the genus Addax, that lives in the Sahara desert. It was first described by Henri de Blainville in 1816. As suggested by its alternative name, this pale antelope has long, twisted horns – typically 55 to 80 cm (22 to 31 in) in females and 70 to 85 cm (28 to 33 in) in males. Males stand from 105 to 115 cm (41 to 45 in) at the shoulder, with females at 95 to 110 cm (37 to 43 in). They are sexually dimorphic, as the females are smaller than males. The colour of the coat depends on the season – in the winter, it is greyish-brown with white hindquarters and legs, and long, brown hair on the head, neck, and shoulders; in the summer, the coat turns almost completely white or sandy blonde.

6. Philippine Eagle

The Philippine Eagle (Pithecophaga jefferyi), also known as the Monkey-eating Eagle, is an eagle of the family Accipitridae endemic to forests in the Philippines. It has brown and white-coloured plumage, and a shaggy crest, and generally measures 86 to 102 cm (2.82 to 3.35 ft) in length and weighs 4.7 to 8.0 kilograms (10 to 18 lb). It is considered the largest of the extant eagles in the world in terms of length, with the Steller’s Sea Eagle and the Harpy Eagle being larger in terms of weight and bulk.


5. Kakapo

The Kakapo (Māori: kākāpō, meaning night parrot), Strigops habroptilus (Gray, 1845), also called owl parrot, is a species of large, flightless, nocturnal, ground dwelling parrot of the super-family Strigopoidea endemic to New Zealand. It has finely blotched yellow-green plumage, a distinct facial disc of sensory, vibrissa-like feathers, a large grey beak, short legs, large feet, and wings and a tail of relatively short length.


4. North Pacific Right Whale

The North Pacific right whale (Eubalaena japonica) is a very large, robust baleen whalespecies that is now extremely rare and endangered. The Northeast Pacific subpopulation, which summers in the southeastern Bering Sea and Gulf of Alaska, may have no more than 50 animals. A western subpopulation that summers in the Sea of Okhotsk between the Kuril Islands and Sakhalin Island appears to number in the low hundreds of animals. Prior to commercial whaling in the North Pacific (i.e. pre-1835) the populations in the North Pacific probably were over 20,000 animals.


3. Javan Rhinoceros

The Javan rhinoceros (more precisely Sunda rhinoceros) or lesser one-horned rhinoceros (Rhinoceros sondaicus) is a member of the family Rhinocerotidae and one of five extant rhinoceroses. It belongs to the same genus as the Indian rhinoceros, and has similar mosaicked skin which resembles armour, but at 3.1–3.2 m (10–10.5 feet) in length and 1.4–1.7 m (4.6–5.8 ft) in height, it is smaller (in fact, it is closer in size to theblack rhinoceros of the genus Diceros). Its horn is usually less than 25 cm (10 inches), smaller than those of the other rhino species.


2. Ivory- Billed Woodpecker

The Ivory-billed Woodpecker (Campephilus principalis) is one of the largestwoodpeckers in the world, at roughly 20 inches in length and 30 inches in wingspan. It was native to the virgin forests of the southeastern United States(along with a separate subspecies native to Cuba). Due to habitat destruction, and to a lesser extent hunting, its numbers have dwindled to the point where it is uncertain whether any remain, though there have been reports that it has been seen again.


1. Western Lowland Gorilla

The western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) is a subspecies of the western gorilla(Gorilla gorilla) that lives in montane, primary, and secondary forests and lowland swamps in central Africa in Angola, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Congo, Equatorial Guinea andGabon. It is the gorilla usually found in zoos. Adult male Gorillas are prone tocardiomyopathy, a degenerative heart disease.


Improve your general knowledge by finding out more about ten of the most important endangered animal species. They are protected in their natural habitats by several laws.